Redistricting 2021 Timeline

September 30, 2020:
Census Data Collection Ends

The US Census Bureau collects population data once every decade.

December 31, 2020:
Census Data Sent to the White House

Spring 2021: Public Meetings are Held

The Louisiana legislature holds public meetings on redistricting.

July 31, 2021:
Census Data Sent to the States

Summer/Early Fall 2021:
Special Legislative Session

The state legislature relies on Census data, public input, and experts to draft district maps Hearings are held on proposed district maps The legislature votes on maps

After Vote:
Governor Approves or Vetoes Map

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September 30, 2020:
Census Data Collection Ends

The US Census Bureau collects population data once every decade.

December 31, 2020:
Census Data Sent to the White House

Spring 2021: Public Meetings are Held

The Louisiana legislature holds public meetings on redistricting.

July 31, 2021:
Census Data Sent to the States

Summer/Early Fall 2021:
Special Legislative Session

The state legislature relies on Census data, public input, and experts to draft district maps Hearings are held on proposed district maps The legislature votes on maps

After Vote:
Governor Approves or Vetoes Map

What is Redistricting?

Redistricting is the process by which governments redraw political districts. It applies to all levels of government where district elections are held, including:
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Redistricting happens once every 10 years: Every year ending in ‘1’ (e.g., 2021), the Louisiana state legislature uses Census data collected the previous year (e.g., 2020) to redraw political maps.
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Political districts are supposed to accurately reflect how populations have changed statewide and locally over the past decade, and provide fair representation to each individual and group.
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There are three basic redistricting principles:
  1. Contiguity: Every district has to remain connected–they can’t “jump” from one place to another.
  2. Compactness: With few exceptions, districts shouldn’t be drawn in extremely odd shapes.
  3. Communities of Interest:This one can be very subjective, and is the most controversial. Generally, districts should try to keep populations that share interests--e.g., fishing communities--together as much as possible.

Why is Redistricting Important?

  • Redistricting plays a critical role in who runs for office, who is elected, and how they vote once they’re in office.
  • It’s one of the most important factors in determining who represents you and how they represent you.

who runs for office

who is elected

how they vote

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  • Your local, state, and federal elected representatives make decisions that impact your everyday life, like economic opportunity, healthcare, schools, roads, and so much more.
  • The makeup of a district can significantly influence how and whether
  • elected officials respond to a community’s needs.
  • Redistricting only happens once every 10 years, and the policy impact can last even longer. We can’t miss this chance to demand fair and representative districts.

How Does Redistricting Work?

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1

The Census Bureau collects population data once every decade, during years ending in ‘0’. That data is then sent to each state, which uses it to inform the redistricting process.
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2

The Louisiana legislature holds public meetings on redistricting. Those meetings are usually run by the two committees that oversee redistricting in the legislature-- House & Governmental Affairs (HGA) and Senate & Governmental Affairs (SGA).
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3

The state legislature relies on Census data, public input, and experts to draft district maps
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4

The House & Governmental Affairs (HGA) committee and Senate & Governmental Affairs (SGA) committee each hold hearings on proposed district maps. Any proposed map must be approved by a majority of the committee members in order to go to a vote on either the House or Senate floor.
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5

When either HGA or SGA pass a map, it goes to a vote on either the House or Senate floor. When a majority of each chamber then approves a map, the two different versions (House and Senate) must be reconciled to create a single map that needs to get approved by both chambers. The final map goes to the Governor’s desk to be signed or vetoed.
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6

Once the legislature agrees on a map, it is sent to the Governor who can approve or veto it. If the Governor and legislature can’t ultimately agree on a map, the State Supreme Court takes over the redistricting process

Who is Responsible for Redistricting?

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Louisiana Legislature

  • U.S. Congress
  • State Senate & House
  • State Supreme Court
  • Board of Elementary and Secondary Education (BESE)
  • Public Service Commission (PSC)
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  • The public plays a key role in determining how the redistricting process plays out and how the district lines are ultimately drawn.
  • Submit comments during public redistricting hearings.
  • Anyone can do it.
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Local Governments

  • City Council
  • Parish Council
  • Police Jury
  • Judicial